Nestlé proves CSR can give your company a “Good Life”

Have you ever wondered where your coffee comes from? (Picture courtesy of Nestlé)

Have you ever wondered where your coffee comes from? (Picture courtesy of Nestlé)

Have you noticed that more and more people seem to be walking around carrying cups of coffee in their hands? Whether they’ve stopped by Starbucks, their local cafe or have made it at home, coffee cups seem to have become the ultimate accessory for both men and women.

I don’t know whether this is due to the fact that people lead such hectic lives that they just don’t have time to sit down for their coffee, or whether they are drinking more of it than they used to. What statistics do show, however, is that there is a good chance that the coffee they’re drinking is made by Nestlé, as 5,500 cups of Nescafé alone are drunk every second.

As the world’s leading nutrition, health and wellness company, Nestlé’s motto of “Good Food, Good Life” has lead them to be one of the world’s most profitable corporations. However, things weren’t always so good. Continue reading

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Humble pie, coming right up!

P&G's special Olympic logo for London 2012.

P&G’s special Olympic logo for London 2012.

I love pies. And cakes. But no matter how hard I try, I still haven’t quite aquired a taste for Humble Pie. It’s tough when you have to admit that you were wrong about something or, even worse, that somebody else was right. But sometimes there’s no getting around it and when that happens it’s best to put on a big smile, learn your lesson and make the best of it. And that’s exactly what Procter and Gamble has done. After years and years of doing things “the P&G way” they’ve decided to completely change their branding strategy and, having had a nice big piece of humble pie, are falling into line with the competition. But who the heck is P&G and why is this such a big deal? Continue reading

Banks need a visit from the Ghost of Christmas Future. ASAP.

Mr. Potter, The banker from "It's a wonderful life".

Mr. Potter, the banker from “It’s a wonderful life” (1946).

When I picture the CEO of a bank, I can’t help but come up with an image like the one featured in this post. An arrogant, selfish, ruthless older gentleman who is a mix between the mean old men who tormented Mr. Banks in “Mary Poppins” and Pre-Christmas-Ghosts-Scrooge. I know this idea is pretty far from the truth, but I’m not sure that everybody else does. Continue reading