Do we understand who we’re talking to?

In a global world, we need to be able to communicate with people from different cultures.

In a global world, we need to be able to communicate with people from different cultures.

During my time in the field of PR, I’ve been lucky enough to have met people from many different places and backgrounds. I have colleagues from Greece, China, the US, Brazil, India, Spain, Norway, the UK… Not only do we have fun working together, but we’ve also had the opportunity to learn from each other, as we all come from different cultures and therefore think differently and work differently. Nevertheless, statistics show that our small version of the U.N. is an exception to the rule as most professionals in our field are, in the case of the UK, white British females.  For a profession that prides itself on being modern and open, this seems pretty close-minded. These studies show a lack of diversity in the field regarding gender, race and culture of which the implications are great: How does PR intend to effectively engage with people from different backgrounds if it doesn’t really understand who it’s talking to? Continue reading

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Could social media be the end of the “PR Girl”?

Women's extended use of social media might help to close the PR gender gap.

Women’s extended use of social media might help to close the PR gender gap.

While doing some research for a paper I’m writing (it seems like I do a lot of both lately) I came across an interesting article that brings together the ideas of gender and social media. The authors, Piet Verhoeven and Noelle Aarts, put forth an interesting idea: social media might help solve the issue of the gender gap in PR! Finally, something more or less tangible that we, men and women, can understand and relate to. Whether you’re a he or a she, read on for some insights that could make or break your career. Continue reading

Ladies of PR: Burn your bras!

Tyra Banks provs that bra burning is actually fun (2008).

Tyra Banks is joined by friends in a good old fashioned bra-burning in (2008).

OK, I don’t mean this literally (anyone who buys them knows that good bras are expensive and hard to find), but keep reading and you’ll get what I mean.
I recently did some research about the gender gap in PR and I was very surprised (shocked, actually) when I read what some academics have to say about the issue. To give you a bit of background information, women represent 70% of the PR workforce, but continue earn just 75 percent of what men earn and still have difficulties reaching management level positions. Considering the proportion of women versus men in the field, I wonder… What is going on? Continue reading